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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  October 6, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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if you want any more lighter. if you want any more details log on to the bbc weather website or the bbc weather app. today at 5pm, theresa may insists she has the support of her cabinet — after a former party chairman calls for her to go. she was forced to defend her position after claims that around 30 conservative mps want a leadership election. what i think is necessary for the country now, what the country needs is calm leadership, that's exactly what i'm providing, and i'm providing that with the full support of my cabinet. after the prime minister's difficult conference speech — former chairman grant shapps claims seniorfigures in the party support his challenge. are there cabinet members aware? yes. do some support it? yes. that's not what they'll say to you in public. we'll have the latest from westminster, and getting the thoughts of the conservative mp kwasi kwarteng. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm. a father loses his claim for damages against an ivf clinic,
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after his ex—partner forged his signature to use a frozen embryo. the catalan parliament defies madrid to press ahead with a debate that could trigger a declaration of independence from spain. the funeral is held for liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in coronation street — fellow stars payed tribute. she was a gentle, calm, quiet, loving, so loving, so generous, she gave so many things to so many people. 35 years after the original, blade runner 2049 is out. we'll get mark kermode‘s thoughts on that and the rest of the week's cinema releases in the film review. our main story at 5pm —
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theresa may has insisted she has the "full support of the cabinet" to continue as prime minister. she was forced to defend herself after claims that about 30 conservative mps want a leadership election. the former tory party chairman grant shapps is leading the attempt to unseat mrs may. he says five former cabinet ministers are among those calling for her to stand down, following her speech at the party conference this week, which was plagued by a series of mishaps. 0ur political correspondent leila nathoo reports from westminster. away from westminster, an attempt to clear the air. seemingly unphased by questions over her authority, a message to those who want her out. what i think is necessary for the country now,
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what the country needs, is calm leadership, that's exactly what i am providing. i am providing that with the full support of my cabinet. he has been revealed as the ringleader of a plot to oust theresa may from downing street, former party chairman grant shapps. he claims up to 30 mps, including five former cabinet ministers, are now in favour of telling her time is up. 0ver over a period of time from the general election where it went badly wrong, we might be better served by having a leadership election sooner rather than later. this was really to try and gather those people together to say that to her. under party rules, it would take 48 conservative mps to officially register their discontent to get a leadership contest. at the moment the current group of rebels fall short. they had approached the
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promised it directly to express their concerns, but now it is out and reopen it is unclear whether they will still be able to mount a challenge. theresa may's critics... lie i think she has been doing a good job this week, i think the supporters in the country and voters are all focused on just one thing, making sure the prime minister can be supported. she has no obvious successor and her mps don't want to risk another election but she must tighten her grip on her party. this plot may yet fizzle out, but her opponents are still circling. and we can talk to our political correspondent jonathan blake, who is in westminster now. if this was a plot — has mrs may seen it off? for now, i think yes. when grant
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shapps emerged as the ringleader as this plot this morning, he attempted to gain more support. i think what we saw was the frustration that's been bubbling on many conservative mps since the disastrous election result earlier this year, blew the lid off this attempt to unseat the prime minister. and to gather enough support to go to her and say, now is the time you to stand aside. what we have seen today is conservative mps rallying around, those who want to stick their neck out and talk in public saying that grant shapps has missed judged the mood. many saying that he should quite frankly, shut up. this particular plot was a flash in the pan and theresa may continues in the pan and theresa may continues in thejob as in the pan and theresa may continues in the job as prime minister. in the pan and theresa may continues in thejob as prime minister. as in the pan and theresa may continues in the job as prime minister. as we heard in that report saying that she is providing calm leadership and pointedly adding that she has the
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full support of her cabinet. the political landscape remains the same, a lot of mps are scared of an election, they do not want german —— jeremy corbyn to end up in number ten. there is no obvious successor to ta ke ten. there is no obvious successor to take up the job ten. there is no obvious successor to take up thejob any time ten. there is no obvious successor to take up the job any time soon. theresa may continues as prime minister, whether she is fighting on valiantly as long as she wants, or if she is living on waiting for the next crisis to finally finish off, that depends on who you talk to. joining me is conservative mp kwasi kwarteng at our westminster studio. another conservative party psychodrama, how long do you think theresa may is safe for? will he be leading the party into the next election? i think we have a big job at hand. and she is going to be leading the country through the brexit negotiations for as long as she wants. i think the vast majority of mps, conservative mps are
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supporting her. she had a tough time, we have to admit that, in the speech. but what came through was her determination, her integrity, she mentioned calm leadership, and i think that's what she's provided very well. i haven't come here to discredit grant shapps, but i think that he has his own particular axe to grind, he was on the government and no longer is a minister. of course, he probably feels that his career might well best be served if theresa may was removed. but i think the vast majority of the conservative party in parliament is fully behind the prime minister. his argument is that she rolled the dice by calling that snap election, she blew it. and he said that the conference was a chance for her to reboot a leadership, and she blew it again. we can't pretend the election was a great success again. we can't pretend the election was a great success for the conservatives. many people regret
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the result. but the fact is that we're in the middle, rather at the start of brexit negotiations. the prime minister has made very clear that she wants to see that through, andi that she wants to see that through, and i think everyone is supporting her on that. when you say everyone is supporting her, a lot of people will say that she is being undermined by colleagues, especially the foreign secretary, who has differed with her on brexit, with his own particular red lines. differed with her on brexit, with his own particular red lineslj should have corrected what i said. the vast majority of mps eye with her and support her. i have been in parliament long enough to realise that if every stage you get disaffected mps, i remember this was an issue under david cameron's government in coalition. there are a lwa ys government in coalition. there are always a number of people that feel they have been overlooked, a number of people that they are —— bear various grudges. i think grant shapps has got a completely wrong
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this time. he has misjudged the mood and given where we are with brexit negotiations, given where we are generally in the country, i think there is a realfeeling generally in the country, i think there is a real feeling that we have to get behind the prime minister and support her in best ways we can.“ that a message to people like boris johnson specifically to get on the prime minister hummer rather than implicitly to criticise her. it is not cliche, we should either hang together or hang separately. that essentially says there is no point in trying to rip it apart and grab leadership. if that means the conservative party is discredited and weak. no one benefits from that. the only people who do in fact to benefit is our political opponents. i don't think it makes any sense to have leadership contests or infighting, andi have leadership contests or infighting, and i would say to all cabinet ministers that the parliamentary party doesn't want to see the kind of psychodrama as you
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described it, i'm filed any more. i think we need to get behind the prime minister and get on with trying to provide stable government. grant shapps said that he had about 30 mp5 grant shapps said that he had about 30 mps including five former cabinet ministers supporting him and supporting a challenge. he only needs 48 to trigger the leadership election, it is not that far off it. the first thing is that i don't think you'll get anywhere near 48. i don't know where he's come up with this 30 figure. maybe he has a spreadsheet, i don't know. but i don't detect any groundswell of opinion tending towards him will stop i don't think the vast majority of the conservative parliamentary tea m wa nt to of the conservative parliamentary team want to follow him on this. i think it's very clear that theresa may, as you saw from the response today in yesterday, enjoys wide support the party, and i think grant shapps has wrong. i think he has com pletely shapps has wrong. i think he has completely missed called the mood. thank you for your time. the catalan leader will make an
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address which will follow last weekend unofficial referendum. it comes as senior spanish police officers issued an anonymous letter officers issued an anonymous letter of apology for the violence in that vote. another day, another development in the crisis. swiss authorities confirmed they have contacted the spanish government, offering to help as negotiator. but there seems little chance of that, spain's prime minister refusing any dialogue, he is clear that separatist parties have broken the constitution, unless plans to break off are cancelled. across the spectrum of left and right wing newspapers, in spain or catalonia, headlines are the same, banks leaving, other companies threatening to do the same, a countdown to crisis. in three days' time,
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the catalan government is set for separation, and there is desperate planning for what happens next. 0ne catalan workers union is calling for people to take to the streets and close businesses next week. on tuesday next week, after the declaration, we are calling for a general strike for five days. from tuesday. because we saw last week, the violent police crackdown violating the rights of the workers. we are standing up for the rights of the workers in the country. today, a group of senior spanish police officers wrote an anonymous open letter of apology for the police violence during the banned referendum. they said that they were ashamed and that it was a difficult event. here in barcelona some say they fear
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about working on the street because of the backlash. translation: i do not see civil war, somebody who declares independence does not want to be part of spain, that could cause confrontation on the streets. the divide has even spilled over into sport, it has affected the spanish football team playing in alicante tonight, just days after gerard pique was booed in training for supporting the rights of catalans to vote for their future. carles puigdemont has requested to appear before catalan parliament to make an announcement on tuesday, suggesting there is a chance that any declaration on independence could be delayed by 24 hours. that speaking out to an mep with the
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catalonian republic party, who is pro—independence and joins us now. do you think there will be a declaration of independence next week at that session of parliament? probably, i don't know. but i think we should distinguish between declaration and proclamation. that's what ca rles declaration and proclamation. that's what carles puigdemont had in mind when he said if we win the referendum we will declare independence and then after some months we will proclaim it, we need some time to gather people around to get international recognition. now, is just get international recognition. now, isjust a declaration, that get international recognition. now, is just a declaration, that we want to be an independent country. what you think the response would be the spanish authorities to a declaration of independence, because we saw the
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violence during the referendum? absolutely. i don't think anything is new in the spanish government before the referendum, jeering and after the referendum. they are absolutely against everything that iraq during the referendum. i don't expect anything could from them ——. we are not in an age of the civil war, it is not true at all. people are smiling on the street, they are buying things, they are making an ordinary life. but the spanish police are trying to provoke problems and they can achieve that if they try. and then there was not a single word for the 900 people
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injured during the ist of october, which is unbelievable. i think the king of spain hasn't realised that he has no moral... there have been reports today that switzerland might intervene, might try to broker some kind of compromise, broker some kind of talks between catalonia and the spanish government, is there any possibility of compromise, would you expect anything less than full independence. in fact we have an election in september 2015 where those who were running to the election declared, if you elect us we will go for independence. and they won 62 out of 135, an absolute majority. that is why according to
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this message from the people, they prepared a referendum. and the referendum took place. nevertheless, because the difficulties were extreme, and in spite of these extreme, and in spite of these extreme difficulties the referendum was one to become independent. i think it is quite normal that our government tries to put into practice but into practice of the people. that is democracy. i cannot understand anything different. bid to speak with you and hear your thoughts. thank you, the mep with the catalonian republic party. this is bbc news at 5 — the headlines: theresa may insists she has the support of her cabinet — after a former party chairman claims 30 conservative mps want a leadership election. the catalan parliament defies madrid to press ahead with a debate that
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could trigger a declaration of independence from spain. a father loses his claim for damages against an ivf clinic — after his ex—partner forged his signature to use frozen embryos. and in sport wales are in action in georgia in their world cup qualifiers. it is all this. aaron ramsey had the best chance of the game. they need to win to keep alive their hopes of going to russia next year. ben stokes when travel to a stranger with the rest of the england squad at the end of this month. the ecb say a final decision has yet to be made. and the deadlines are bidding to host the 2022 commonwealth games is extended just days after birmingham appeared to be the only candidate. the games federation declared birmingham's bid is not fully compliant. there will be more sport in about 15 minutes. join me then. several uk retailers have stopped
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selling baby sleep positioners also known as baby nests , because of concerns about their safety. a us health regulator said they can cause suffocation and have been linked to 12 infant deaths in america. the products are aimed at babies under six months old and are designed to keep them in the same position while they sleep. adina campbell reports. known as baby nests or baby pods, these sleep positioners have become increasingly popular with parents worldwide. but now there are safety fears, described as dangerous by the us health regulator, the fda. it's now advising parents not to use them, claiming they can cause suffocation, resulting in death. babies are safest lying on firm flat surfaces. they can and do move but they don't necessarily have as good control of their bodies at young ages as adults so they can easily get into trouble and not be able
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to get out of that again. the move has caused some of the uk's biggest retailers to also take action. tesco, which sells baby nests on its website, has now made them unavailable. john lewis says it's now withdrawing the one it sells as a precautionary measure. mothercare has told us it's doing the same. ebay has also announced it will no longer be selling them on its websites. the sleep positioners have high sides, designed to keep babies under significance months secure. but parents are divided about them. they are just perfect. because they can't move. you can close it here. it keeps them warm. i like it, my sister likes it. i notice if you know how to position the bar at the bottom where the legs are supposed to be supported, otherwise the baby hunches and you can see it
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could obstruct breathing. this isn't the first time a warning has been given about these baby nests. in 2010, the fda advised people not to buy them following reports of 12 infant deaths linked to the products. it and the nhs recommends that babies sleep in cots, considered to be the safest place. uk productivity fell in the three months tojune, for the second quarter in a row. the measure — which is an important benchmark of the economy's efficiency, dropped by nought—point—one %. the office for national statistics says productivity — the amount each worker produces per hour — is lagging behind the uk's international competitors. uk productivity is now more than 15% below the average of other major advanced economies below in 2016. our business correspondent joe lynam joins me now to go
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through the figures. more disappointing figures on british productivity. it is and the key benchmark of the health of an economy. british has been creating a record number of jobs, but economy. british has been creating a record number ofjobs, but it is not being creating... how much value is created by all those in work. and the rate of change, how much is it growing competitive previous years. 0ver growing competitive previous years. over the last decade, since the financial crisis, british productivity has raised by zero point 8%, that is almost stagnant. although a lot of other countries had a worse recession than us in terms of losing jobs, we have not had a recovery in productivity that we hoped for. it means the overall health of the economy will come up for grabs health of the economy will come up forgrabs in health of the economy will come up for grabs in terms of the expectations for future growth. this is what you are referring to. basically, next week the office for
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budget responsibility, is expected to say we think because of this week productivity, the growth going forward will be less than we thought it would be, as a result may be spending the spare change in the chancellor's partick, spending the spare change in the chancellor's pa rtick, for spending the spare change in the chancellor's partick, for want of a better phrase, we're talking billions of pounds. will be a little bit less than he thought he had the budget next month. thank you. the trial of an army instructor of trying to kill his wife by tampering with her parachute has heard from a expert at the scene of the fall. his wife suffered injuries as she fell over salisbury plain. the court was also showed images for the first time. this is the first time that the
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parachute at the centre of this case is being seen in public. these images and videos of the parachute was shown to the jury by the prosecution. the parachute was examined by an expert who told the court that he had never seen the lines of a main parachute so tangled. he also looked at the reserve parachute, and noticed that ties were missing. the prosecution case is that the man on the left here, sabotaged his wife's parachute by deliberately tangling the main parachute and removing to links. they were both expert parachute jumpers, the court heard that he wa nted jumpers, the court heard that he wanted her dead so he could benefit from her life insurance policy and because he was having an affair with another woman. when his wifejumped both her main and reserve parachute
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failed to open. she fell 4000 feet into a field and suffered multiple injuries. this was so tightly knotted up that it did take a while, and then when he opened up the lines... jury also saw this video when an expert parachute jumper at the airbase examined the parachute like the one used. he explained how important it is not to tangle the main chute, how vital links are on the reserve parachute. the prosecution claimed that the accused kept his tampered parachute in the locker one day because of bad weather when he should have handed it back in. under prosecution from the defence, it was admitted that other parachutists kept their parachute in their lockers or so and to have done so was not unusual. the jury to have done so was not unusual. the jury was also told that he tried to kill his wife a few days earlier in the kitchen. the prosecution say he tampered with this gas fixture. the
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accused denies trying to kill his wife in the kitchen and the alleged parachute incident. next week the jury parachute incident. next week the jury are to visit the airbase where the accident took place. this years nobel peace prize has been awarded to the international the norwegian nobel committee campaign to abolish nuclear weapons — ican. praised the organisation's effort to achieve a ban on nuclear weapons. ican said the award sent a message to president trump and to north korea that having nuclear weapons and threatening to use them was illegal. the funeral of liz dawn, coronation street's vera duckworth for 34 years, has taken place. the cast of the long running soap joined family and fans at salford cathedral. liz dawn died last week at the age of 77 — and although she had no formal training as an actress — she made vera duckworth one of the best known characters on british television.
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simonjones is at salford cathedral. sta rs of stars of coronation street, both past and present traded in the cobbles of weatherfield today for this cathedral to pay their final respects for an actress that created an iconic character for over 30 yea rs. an iconic character for over 30 years. millions of people in each night to see vera duckworth argue with her on—screen husband jack, there will always make up but it was injuring relationship. as a result millions of people who watch them on television felt that they knew the character and felt that they knew her. so much so that today members of the public turned up outside the cathedral. 0ne of the public turned up outside the cathedral. one woman i spoke to was in tears as the funeral possession arrived. she said, i had to come to
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say goodbye. also paying respects we re say goodbye. also paying respects were the cast maths and —— members. she was a gentle, calm, quiet, so loving, so generous, she gave so many things to so many people. what was the mood like in the service?m was the mood like in the service?m was actually like i have described her. loving and quiet and calm and gentle and peaceful. just like liz dawn. goodbye,... i don't think we'll ever say... some tears today, but also some laughter. we heard from liz dawn's son, who said that she spent much of herfinal dawn's son, who said that she spent much of her final months dawn's son, who said that she spent much of herfinal months in
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hospital, that she was determined to come home for her last days to spend time with her children, grandchildren and great—grandchildren. she was able to do that. but what we have heard above all from the people that knew her was the sense of laughter when she met people, she always had a joke to tell. that is what they will a lwa ys joke to tell. that is what they will always remember. thank you. coming up it is the film review. and coming up in the film review, we'll get mark kermode's take on blade runner 2049 — does it live up to the hype? find out at 5:45pm. time for a look at the weather. the weather is mixed. we had plenty of autumn sunshine to start today, but it is clouding over. starting to form outbreaks of rain in northern ireland and scotland. that will be seeking southwards and eastwards through the night. light and patchy,
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some heavier in the hills in the west. it will breathe easier and much less chilly than last night. we start the weekend on a fairly drab note. mostly cloudy, some rain at times. renfrew good part of the day across the south—west of england. plenty of showers leading in through scotla nd plenty of showers leading in through scotland northern ireland and wales. the best hope of brightness is south wales and central southern england. most likely north east england and scotland. temperature is not bad, 14-17, scotland. temperature is not bad, 14—17, although it will be quite breezy. sunday will bring lighter winds, on balance it will be the brighter of the two days. more cloud out west, drizzly showers here and there. top temperatures of 14—17. more details on half an hour. this is bbc news — the headlines... the prime minister insists she has the support of her cabinet after a former conservative chairman said at least 30
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mps want her to face a leadership election. politicians in catalonia are defying the government in madrid to hold a debate that could trigger a declaration of independence from spain. madrid offers fresh regional elections to try to stem the crisis. a father has lost his claim for damages against an ivf clinic, after his ex—partner forged his signature to have a baby daughter from their frozen embryo. the funeral has been held at salford cathedral for liz dawn, who played vera duckworth in coronation street for more than 30 years. time for a look at all the latest sports news. wales are in action in georgia for the first part of their crucial world cup qualifying weekend. they have played around 30 minutes and they are without gareth
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bale, their top scorer out with a ca lf bale, their top scorer out with a calf injury. wales need to win tonight and on monday to give themselves the best chance of qualification for russia next year. most people expect serbia to win the group so most people expect serbia to win the group so second place is likely to be contested between wales and republic of ireland. ireland play moldova at home tonight. serbia in austria. even finishing second in the group doesn't guaranteed a play—off because only seven sides out of mine go through. the england cricket all—rounder ben stokes will not travel to australia with the rest of the squad at the end of the month for the forthcoming ashes tour. the ecb said a final decision is yet to be made on whether he will be involved in the series at all. he remains under investigation after being invested on suspicion of causing actual bodily harm during a night out in bristol last month. stokes still has been given an england central contract today. the bbc‘s cricket correspondent jonathan
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iq. what has been made clear by the ecb is that the police presentation is paramount. that will be senior, if you like. 0nly is paramount. that will be senior, if you like. only when that happens will the ecb's proper disciplinary process kicked in as well. i would suspect that if stokes were to be charged by the police, it would make it very difficult for him to talk. without any charges being made, i would suggest that's the way it's looking. in light of the ongoing ben stokes situation, steven finn has been added to the ashes squad and will stay in australia for the full five match series. three other england players have been warned about their off pitch conduct. jonny ba i rstow, about their off pitch conduct. jonny bairstow, jake ball and liam plu nkett bairstow, jake ball and liam plunkett were given written warnings and investigated following the recent one—day international series against the west indies. the ecb says this is not connected to the stokes incident. just dazed after it appeared birmingham was the only city in line to host the 2022
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commonwealth games, the bidding time has been extended. bids can now be made until the end of november, after the games committee said birmingham's application was not fully compliant. the city was the only bidder before the original deadline last saturday. there's an increasing political risk that qatar might not host the world cup in 2022. that's according to a confidential report obtained by the bbc. the report looks at the ongoing diplomatic crisis between qatar and its neighbours. apparently tournament insiders and organisers have said it's far from certain tournament insiders and organisers have said it's farfrom certain doha will host the tournament. however the qatar 2022 delivery committee says there is absolutely no risk to the project. britain's double 0lympic silver medallist jazz carlin is taking up tank a marathon swimming ina is taking up tank a marathon swimming in a bid to become the first woman in history to win medals in both the pool and open water. she was second in the 400 metres and 800 metres freestyle at rio 2016 but struggled to find direction after the games and withdrew from this
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summer's world championships. she said open water swimming has revitalised her love of the sport and hopes to compete at the olympics in tokyo 2020. that's all the spot for now. as always come you can find out more on all those stories at the bbc sport website. we will be back here with much more for you in sports day at 6:30pm. the sale of almost all ivory, including "antique" items, would be banned under plans set out by the government to help end elephant poaching. the environment secretary michael gove has announced a three—month public consultation on the proposals. trade in musical instruments and some cultural objects would still be allowed. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. v0|ceover: a bonfire of tusks, taken from 6000 elephants, slaughtered in kenya for their ivory. their number has declined by almost a third in the last decade and around 20,000 are killed each year. the government says that it would
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like to ban ivory sales in the uk and has launched a 12—week consultation on its plan. thousands of elephants are being killed every year simply to fuel the illegal ivory trade. we have got to act. so today i'm announcing consultation on a total ban for ivery products, to ensure that we stamp out this evil trade and make sure that one of the most iconic and beautiful animals in the world is there for the next generation. chiswick auctions sells ivory objects that are more than 100 years old. the current rules allow the trade in objects created before 1947, such as these 18th—century miniature portraits and these figures. under the new proposals, their sale would be banned, and that's something the antiques industry thinks is unfair. if you criminalise something, this underground market may appear, this black market, and you can't control that. will it stop the trade at large of illegal ivory
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and the current poaching? i don't see it. these objects are not inexpensive. they are not being sold as ivory, they are being sold as antique and artworks, and they are paid for, heftily, as objects of that type. the new proposals would still allow the sale works of art, or objects of cultural or historic value. there is some concern that such exemptions could become loopholes for the antiques industry but overall, conservation groups are pleased. we really want to see this put in place within a year, so that when they host the london conference on illegal wildlife trade next year, they can demonstrate that they are a global leader in tackling illegal wildlife trade. if the government does ban on ivory sales, britain willjoin the us and china, who have made similar commitments recently, a move that could help save elephants from extinction in many parts of africa. pallab ghosh, bbc news. i'm joined be john stephenson, ceo of stop ivory.
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are you pleased with this government move, this plan? we welcome very much what the government have set out to achieve. and the conditions of the consultation that they have set out. they very much meet the requirements that millions of us have been campaigning for for requirements that millions of us have been campaigning forfor a long time. the devil will be in the detail. we'll see what emerges from the consultation. what the government has set out is welcomed by us. in terms of elephant poaching, extraordinary numbers of elephants are dying. i read 55 african elephants a day are dying. there was a great elephant consensus done last year, so the numbers are pretty exact. at any one stage, those numbers can go up and down, but if you draw a line from the 18th century to today, there is not much longer to go, and that line is a
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straight line downwards. by and large, an elephant is killed every 15 minutes. this is a move by the british government, but one country acting alone can't stop this trade. we would argue the british government has actually come to this late in the day. it's a significant step they are setting out. two years ago, we stand for the very fact that elephant poaching will not stop until people stop buying ivory. two yea rs until people stop buying ivory. two years ago we would have said it's inconceivable where we would be in a position where it's illegal to trade ivory in the uk but illegal in china. —— it's legal to trade in the uk but illegal in china. but since 2014, countries like the united states and china have banned ivory. we are behind the rest of the world? in fairness to the government, this would bring us up with everyone else, and if the regulations that are proposed are put out, we would be one of the most far reaching countries in terms of the
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implantation of banning within the country. there are exceptions, for example, ivory keys on pianos and instruments. does that worry you? example, ivory keys on pianos and instruments. does that worry you ?|j think any practical... people use the word ban. the closure of the ivory market within the uk, i think there are likely to be exemptions. the issue for us on the consultation period will be, what exactly are those exemptions. the garment is setting out the right issues to be talked about. i reservejudgment until it comes out that the goalposts they have set are the right ones. good to talk to you. a father has lost his claim for damages against an ivf clinic after his ex—partnerforged damages against an ivf clinic after his ex—partner forged his signature in order to have a child. the man had been seeking more than £1 million to pay for his daughter's private education and her wedding. the couple already had one child
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through ivf. in 2011, after they had separated, she sent him a message saying she was three months pregnant. she had forged his signature to get a private clinic in london to defrost embryos they had created together. he says it's had a huge impact on the relationship with his daughter. he took the case to court, claiming the clinic was in breach of contract. the man was asking the clinic to pay him more than £1 million for the upbringing of his daughter, for private school fees, holidays, and her wedding. the judge said even know he has lost his case today, his judgment should be seen case today, his judgment should be seen as a case today, his judgment should be seen as a complete personal and moral vindication of the father. the same he said, could not be said of the mother. ivf hammersmith said it has now tightened procedures to make sure this doesn't happen again. we
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are pleased the judge sure this doesn't happen again. we are pleased thejudge ruled in our favour that we were not negligent and dismissed the case against the clinic. as a matter of law, if she forged the signature, then we didn't have his written consent, but moving forward , have his written consent, but moving forward, as a clinic, we always contact both parties so they should never happen again support the father says this was never about money, but about justice. father says this was never about money, butaboutjustice. he father says this was never about money, but aboutjustice. he does plan to appeal against the decision today not to award him damages. the oscar—winning hollywood film producer harvey weinstein says he's taking a leave of absence from his work and seeking the help of therapists. it follows a report that eight women have made sexual harassment allegations against the 65—year—old, stretching back over nearly three decades. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. v0|ceover: for more than 30 years, harvey weinstein has been one of the best—known studio bosses in hollywood. a regularface on red carpets. shakespeare in love, pulp fiction, the english patient, he has been the power broker behind many award—winning movies. there was no secret that there
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was a certain robustness in the way that he did business but he is now officially on leave from his company after a series of allegations about his behaviour towards women. in a statement he says: however, many of the allegations of sexual harassment are patently false, according to a lawyer representing mr weinstein, but that lawyer, lisa bloom, does admit: and says she would, if they want, be present during those meetings. so while harvey weinstein is taking on lawyers to challenge some of the reports, he has admitted failings,
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saying he came of age in the 1960s and 1970s when behaviour in the workplace was different. but adds it is no excuse for the way he has acted and he is now seeking therapy. david sillito, bbc news. this is bbc news at 5:00pm — the headlines... theresa may insists she has the support of her cabinet — after a former party chairman claims 30 conservative mps want a leadership election. politicians in catalonia press ahead with plans to declare independence from spain as madrid offers fresh regional elections to try to stem the crisis. a father loses his claim for damages against an ivf clini, after his ex—partner forged his signature to use frozen embryos. now on bbc news a look ahead to sportsday at 6:30pm tonight... we've got a packed programme to look
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forward to. we will be keeping our eyes on wales' world cup qualifier in georgia and looking ahead to tomorrow's super league grand final in company of leeds legend kevin sinfield. we will have the latest news on the england ashes squad as well as finding outjust news on the england ashes squad as well as finding out just why birmingham's bid to host the 2022 commonwealth games isn't cut and dried just yet, despite being the only city to submit a bid on time. that's at 6:30pm. now it's time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? we

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